Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Page 4 sur 4 Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4

Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Uppark House

Message par La nuit, la neige le Mer 6 Fév - 14:13

Merci Gouv', et merci pour les liens.

Pas si mal, la visite d'Uppark House...
Notamment un petit cabinet "Pagode" amusant :
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 13745010

Et une étonnante maison de poupées, XVIIIe siècle.
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 4916710

Idea S'il y a des amateurs, je rappelle nos sujets :

Arrow Mannequins et poupées de mode au XVIIIe siècle

Arrow Poupées royales à la cour de Louis XVI
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Gouverneur Morris le Mer 6 Fév - 15:52

La nuit, la neige a écrit:Notamment un petit cabinet "Pagode" amusant :
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 13745010

Il se dit que le Prince de Galles l'utilisait pour nouer la laisse de son chien à l'un de ses pieds Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 808868115 ... celui-ci ayant tendance à marquer son territoire aux quatre coins des salons Eventaille
Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris

Messages : 6257
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Jeu 14 Fév - 19:35

Comme je suis en ce moment dans les portraits peints par Angelica Kauffmann, j'en profite pour poster ici une étude du visage de la belle Emma Hamilton :
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Dp819610
Portrait of Emma Hamilton
Angelica Kauffmann
Drawing, c. 1791
At lower right, inscribed (partially effaced) "[...] Drawing / by Angelica Kauffman / of Lady Hamilton / sometime aft. 1792" in graphite.
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Pour l'instant, je n'ai malheureusement pas retrouvé l'image du portrait abouti peint par l'artiste. Il est en collection privée.
Nous pouvons cependant l'imaginer grâce à cette gravure :

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Captu174
Lady Emma Hamilton as Thalia
After painting by Angelica Kauffman
Engraving by Raphael Morghen, 1797
Photo : Thorvaldsensmuseum.dk
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Mme de Sabran le Jeu 14 Fév - 19:39

La nuit, la neige a écrit:Comme je suis en ce moment dans les portraits peints par Angelica Kauffmann, j'en profite pour poster ici une étude du visage de la belle Emma Hamilton :

J'adore ! Very Happy
Je comprends que Nelson soit tombé les pattes en croix !

_________________
...    demain est un autre jour .
Mme de Sabran
Mme de Sabran

Messages : 41492
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013
Localisation : l'Ouest sauvage

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Dim 9 Juin - 9:30

Idea Prochainement présenté en vente aux enchères, je cite l'intéressante note au catalogue (en anglais, désolé) :

- Elisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun (Paris 1755-1842)
Portrait of Emma Hart, later Lady Hamilton (1765-1815), as the Cumaen Sibyl

Oil on canvas
54 ½ x 39 in. (138.4 x 99 cm.)
Provenance : (Probably) Timoléon de Cossé-Brissac, duc de Brissac (1775-1848), and by descent in the family until 1919 (...)
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 2019_c11
Photo : Christie's

Lot Essay

This celebrated portrait of the famed beauty Emma Hart, later Lady Hamilton, stands as a testament to the abilities of one of the most talented female artists in the canon.
Known in two versions, the portrait achieved almost immediate renown and remained, for the rest of her life, Vigée Le Brun’s greatest achievement.


She herself felt that the portrait represented the pinnacle of her career, as it, of all her works, most successfully transcended portraiture, entering into the academically hallowed field of history painting. It also remained one of her favourite works.
In her Souvenirs of 1835, Vigée Le Brun recounted the effect the work had on a group of young artists in Parma:

‘Having spoken of their desire to meet me, they continued by saying that they would very much like to see one of my paintings. Here is one I have recently completed, I replied, pointing to the Sibyl. At first their surprise held them silent; I consider this far more flattering than the most fulsome praise; several then said that they had thought the painting the work of one of the masters of their school; one actually threw himself at my feet, his eyes full of tears.
I was even more moved, more delighted with their admiration since the Sibyl had always been one of my favourite works. If any among my readers would accuse me of vanity, I beg them to reflect that an artist works all his life to experience two or three moments such as the one I have just described.’


Earlier depictions of Emma painted by George Romney, such as Emma Hart as Circe (Rothschild Collection, Waddesdon Manor), a sketch for which is at Tate Britain, and Emma Hart as Ariadne (London, National Maritime Museum), though they may have pertained to depict her in classical guise, remained rooted in the British portraiture tradition.
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 George13
Emma Hart as Circe
George Romney
Oil on canvas, 1782
Image : Rotschild Collection, Waddesdon Manor, via Wikipedia


Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Captu338
Emma Hart as Circe
George Romney
Oil on canvas, c. 1782
Image : Tate Britain


Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Bhc27310
Emma Hart, later Lady Hamilton (1765-1815), also formerly known as 'Lady Hamilton as Ariadne'
George Romney
Oil on canvas, c. 1785-86
Image : National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London.


However, Le Brun’s more mature work can only be correctly understood in respect to the Italian trajectory that led her to artists such as Annibale Carracci, and from him to Domenichino, whose own Cumaean Sybil (Rome, Galleria Borghese) has rightly been identified as one of the direct influences on the present composition.

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Image810
The Sibilla Cumana (Cumaean Sibyl)
Domenicho Zampieri (Domenichino)
17th Century
Galleria Borghese
Photo : Wikipedia


As evidenced by the present portrait, Le Brun’s wonderfully rich and controlled brushwork lends itself perfectly to the earlier master’s style, which aimed to surpass the imperfections of nature, developing a superior idea del bello (idea of beauty). Indeed, her composition can be said to have bettered even Emma’s legendary beauty, as the artist herself recounted:

‘I went [to the Hamilton residence] everyday, desiring to progress quickly with the picture.
The duchesse de Fleury and the Princess Joseph de Monaco were present at the third sitting, which was the last. I had wound a scarf round her head in the shape of a turban, one end hanging down in graceful folds. This headdress so beautified her that the ladies declared she looked ravishing ... She went to her apartment to change [for dinner], and when she came back … her new costume, which was a very ordinary one … had so altered her to her disadvantage that the two ladies had all the difficulty in the world in recognising her
’.

As the French Revolution erupted violently in July 1789, Vigée Le Brun fell into a depression and, realising that her close association with Queen Marie-Antoinette placed her in danger, sought refuge in the homes of relatives.
On 6 October, as the mobs were invading Versailles to take the royal family back to Paris, she fled France in one of the first waves of emigration, departing for Rome with her daughter and her governess, in what would be the start of a twelve-year exile. Although personally unsettling, her years in exile were professionally successful and highly productive as she travelled through Italy, Austria, Russia, Germany, England and Switzerland, welcomed into each European court as a revered survivor of the final days of the Ancien Régime and showered with commissions from foreign aristocrats and fellow refugees alike.

Vigée Le Brun arrived in Naples in April 1790, having received a number of important commissions there arranged through the intervention of Queen Maria Carolina, a sister of Marie-Antoinette.
Over the next two years, the artist shuttled back and forth between Naples and Rome, necessitated by her relentless schedule of portrait commissions.

It was on her third extended stay in Naples, in the spring of 1791, that she began work on the portrait of Emma Hamilton as the Cumaean Sibyl, the work that the artist herself would come to regard as her personal favourite.

It is the last of three portraits that Vigée Le Brun made of the celebrated beauty who, just a few months later, would become the wife of Sir William Hamilton (1730-1803), English Minister to Naples and a renowned archeologist, vulcanologist, and connoisseur of ancient art, whose collection of antiquities, vases and carved gems would eventually form the nucleus of the British Museum.

Vigée Le Brun writes in her Souvenirs (1835) that she met her glamorous sitter only days after she arrived in Naples in the spring of 1790, when Sir William Hamilton appeared at her studio and introduced them:

‘…he requested that my first portrait in the town might be that of an exceptionally beautiful woman whom he introduced to me as Mme. Hart, his mistress; she later became Lady Hamilton, and her beauty brought her great fame.’

A legendary beauty, Emma Hart was, by the time of her first meeting with Vigée Le Brun, one of the most frequently painted models in Europe and famously the subject of dozens of portraits by George Romney, as well as by a host of other painters throughout the continent.
‘The life of Lady Hamilton reads like a romantic fiction,’ wrote Vigée Le Brun.

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton

Biographie que vous pouvez passer si vous connaissez son histoire.  Wink

Spoiler:
Christened Emy Lyon on 12 May 1765 in the Welsh mining town of Denhall, she was the daughter of an illiterate blacksmith and his wife. Her father died months after her birth and, at the age of 12, she entered domestic service in the home of a local surgeon. Her impoverished mother took a position as a servant in London, where she changed her surname to Cadogan.
Emy joined her there and was engaged as a children’s nanny, eventually employed by Thomas Linley, owner of the royal theatre of Drury Lane. Assuming the name of Emma Hart, she became the mistress of several well-born men until December 1781, when, pregnant and abandoned, she appealed to another protector, Charles Francis Greville, second son of the Earl of Warwick and a descendant, on his mother’s side, of the second Duke of Hamilton. Greville set her up in a modest house in Edgware Row with her mother and newborn daughter.

In 1782, he introduced Emma to the painter George Romney, who painted her in an extended series of portraits, usually in literary, historical or mythological guise; when sold, the pictures netted Greville a portion of the proceeds.

In 1784, Emma met Greville’s recently widowed uncle, Sir William Hamilton, who had been serving for two decades as Britain’s emissary to the Bourbon Court at Naples.
Immediately besotted with her beauty and vivacity, Sir William commissioned his friend Sir Joshua Reynolds to paint her as a Bacchante, and soon followed portraits by Richard Cosway, Dominique Vivant-Denon, Gavin Hamilton, Sir Thomas Lawrence, Angelica Kauffman, Pietro Novelli and Wilhelm Tischbein, among others, making Emma Hart perhaps the most often painted Englishwoman of her era.

With Greville intending to marry an heiress who would provide him with the income he required, Emma was sent off to Naples in March 1786; by November of that year, she was installed as Hamilton’s mistress in an apartment in his official residence in the Palazzo Sessa, overlooking the Bay of Naples. After quickly learning French and Italian, she charmed her way into the highest echelons of Neapolitan society, becoming confidante to Maria Carolina.

Emma became a conspicuous personality in Naples, applauded for her peculiar entertainments known as ‘Attitudes’ or ‘tableaux vivants’, which were highly dramatic forms of posturing or pantomimes in which she assumed poses of famous historical, literary or artistic characters, a gift which had certainly inspired Romney’s portraits of her and which was encouraged by Hamilton.
Her Medea and Niobe were the most acclaimed of her ‘improvisations in action’. If her ‘Attitudes’ sound vaguely preposterous to modern readers, some of her contemporaries acknowledged the same, but still praised their unique dramatic execution: the comtesse de Boigne observed that while ‘the description of [them] appears silly’, they, nonetheless, ‘delighted all the spectators and excited the artists.’

Vigée Le Brun herself wrote: ‘There was nothing stranger than this faculty that Lady Hamilton acquired, allowing her to suddenly change her expression from grief to joy; thus, she was able to pose for many different characters ... She passed from sorrow to joy, from joy to terror, so rapidly and so convincingly that we were all delighted.’

No less discerning a critic than Goethe found himself mesmerised by the two performances of hers that he saw in March 1787:

‘Sir William Hamilton, who is still living here as English ambassador, has now, after many years of devotion to the arts and the study of nature, found the acme of these delights in the person of an English girl of twenty with a beautiful face and a perfect figure. He has had a Greek costume made for her which becomes her extremely. Dressed in this, she lets down her hair and, with a few shawls, gives so much variety to her poses, gestures, expressions, etc., that the spectator can hardly believe his eyes.
He sees what thousands of artists would have liked to express realized before him in movements and surprising transformations … She knows how to arrange the folds of her veil to match each mood, and has a hundred ways of turning it into a headdress. The old knight idolizes her and is quite enthusiastic about everything she does. In her he has found all the antiquities, all the profiles of Sicilian coins, even the Apollo Belvedere.
This much is certain: as a performance, it’s like nothing you ever saw before in your life.


Vigée Le Brun painted three portraits of Emma Hart, works that are as much history paintings as likenesses of their famous sitter.

In the first, Emma is depicted as a Bacchante (or Ariadne) reclining in a grotto by the sea. That work, now in a private collection, was commissioned by Sir William Hamilton and begun shortly after their first meeting in the spring of 1790.

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Vlblha10
Lady hamilton as Bacchante (or Ariadne)
Oil on canvas, 1792
A faithful small copy by Henry Bone is in the Wallace Collection in London.
Image : Batguano.com


In the second portrait (Cheshire, Port Sunlight, Lady Lever Art Gallery), which the artist retained in her own collection until her death in 1842, Emma is shown at three-quarter-length dancing before Mount Vesuvius with a tambourine in her hand.
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 3b552p10
Lady Hamilton en Bacchante dansant devant le Vésuve
Oil on canvas, circa 1790
Image : National Museums Liverpool via Wikipedia


For the third and final portrait, which Vigée Le Brun considered one of her masterpieces, the sitter appears as the Cumaean Sibyl, writing a Greek text on a scroll.
In antiquity, the Sibyl of Cumae – named after the site of a town founded by the Greeks northwest of Naples on the coast of Campania – was a seer and oracle who uttered prophesy under the divine inspiration of Apollo.

The three sittings that Emma gave the artist took place in the summer of 1791 at the Hamilton villa at Caserta, 25 miles north of Naples.
Vigée Le Brun finished the portrait somewhat later, following her return to Rome, at which point she signed and dated it ‘1792’.

It appears to have been commissioned by the comtesse du Barry’s lover, the duc de Brissac, then the governor of Paris and head of Louis XVI’s palace guard.


The original painting is today in the Capricorn Foundation at Ramsbury Manor, Wiltshire.

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Capt1178
Lady Hamilton as the Cumaean Sibyl
Oil on canvas, 1792
Pas mieux comme image, désolé ! Source : Batguano.com


The present painting is an exact, autograph replica of the prime version.
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 2019_c13
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 2019_c12
Photos : Christie's

Why Vigée Le Brun made two versions of the painting, of equally high quality and in quick succession, is unclear.
Joseph Baillio has speculated that the immediate acclaim with which the painting was received may have prompted the artist to keep it for herself, to accompany her from city to city in her exile as her artistic ‘calling card’.

If this theory is correct, the present replica would then have been made to fulfil the commission from Brissac and, indeed, the present canvas was in the Cossé-Brissac collection in Paris until 1919.
It may also have been the version sent to Paris from St. Petersburg to be exhibited in the Salon of 1798; a full-sized version was in the estate sale of the artist’s ex-husband, J.-B.-P. Le Brun, sold at auction on 16 May 1814, lot 80.
However, it is also possible that she kept the signed and dated picture for herself simply because, by the time it was completed and ready for delivery, the duc de Brissac was dead, having been slain in a revolutionary massacre on 9 September 1792.

In any event, Vigée Le Brun kept the prime version, which travelled with her to Austria, Russia, Germany and England, and was used to advertise and promote her unexcelled abilities as a portrait painter; it was only in 1819 that she was coerced into selling it to the duc de Berry.

A superb, bust-length version of the composition (today in a private collection) appears in the list of paintings from her hand that Vigée Le Brun included as an appendix to her memoirs; she presented it as a gift to Sir William Hamilton who, she notes acidly, ‘without hesitating, sold it.
It appeared in Hamilton’s sale at Christie’s in 1801, lot 28, and was purchased there by Alleyne FitzHerbert, 1st Baron St Helens, who also owned Mme Le Brun’s original Self-Portrait of the Artist Wearing a Straw Hat (1782; Private collection).

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Img_3511

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Lady_e12
Photos : les reporters du Forum de Marie-Antoinette.  Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 3622972399

Vigée Le Brun was certainly prompted to paint Emma Hart in historical guises in all three portraits of her by the sitter’s much-admired talent for ‘Attitudes’ and by Hamilton’s enthusiasm for them.
The present painting is virtually a tableau vivant laid down on canvas, with the sitter dressed in ‘Greek’ costume and a turban flatteringly framing her lovely face as she gazes heavenward for inspiration.
The picture’s great success was born of Vigée Le Brun’s ability to convey Emma’s beauty, sensuality and pure animal magnetism with such force while still maintaining a sense of dignity and decorum.
Soon after completing it, she took it with her on a journey to Vienna. Here, she explains :

I immediately painted the portrait of the daughter of the Spanish Ambassador, mademoiselle de Kaguenek … as well as the Baron and Baroness de Strogonoff. My Sibyl, which people came in their droves to admire, played no small part in convincing people to ask me to paint them’.

If Vigée Le Brun’s later years were filled with more triumphs and continuing professional success, Emma Hart’s years were to be far fewer in number and marked by sorrows.

Suite de la biographie et triste fin de vie de Lady Hamilton

Spoiler:
She married Sir William in London in September 1791, becoming Lady Hamilton. In 1798, she began her notorious love affair with Admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), later the storied hero of the Battle of Trafalgar.

She returned to England with her husband and her lover in 1800, and the next year gave birth to Nelson’s daughter, Horatia. Tragically, Hamilton and Nelson died within two years of each other. Emma fell into catastrophic debt and alcoholism and was finally imprisoned in 1813 for insolvency.
Upon her release from prison, she fled to Calais and died in 1815, penniless, aged 50.

Note : We are grateful to Joseph Baillio for his assistance with this entry. He will be including the present lot in his forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the paintings of Vigée Le Brun.
Source : Christie's London - Old Masters Evening Sale, 4 July 2019
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Gouverneur Morris le Mer 19 Juin - 18:02

Merci LNLN pour cette belle annonce !

J'en appelle à l'expertise d'Eléonore : je croyais en effet que la Sybille de Cumes était l'idiote qui avait demandé la vie et non la jeunesse éternelle (Eventaille), et donc qu'à cause de cela c'était la sybille que l'on représentait toujours fripée et ridée...

Me trompe-je ? Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 3177668066
Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris

Messages : 6257
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Mme de Sabran le Mer 19 Juin - 21:01

Gouverneur Morris a écrit:
Me trompe-je ? Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 3177668066

Non, tu as tout à fait raison, mon cher Momo . En échange de ses faveurs, la Pythie avait demandé à Apollon autant d'années de vie que sa main contenait de grains de sable . En dépit de la parole donnée, elle se refusa au dieu dont la vengeance fut terrible : vieillesse, décrépitude et quasi-immortalité !
J'ajoute que lorsque l'on est à Naples, outre Caserte, Capodimonte, le Vésuve, Herculanum, Pompéi, la villa de Poppée et cette côte amalfitaine de rêve, il faut absolument se rendre à Cumes et pénétrer dans l'antre de la Pythie, s'enfoncer dans cet espèce de souterrain comme un couloir un peu pyramidal, sombre et mystérieux à souhait, propice à tous les délires . J'ai bien aimé ! Wink

_________________
...    demain est un autre jour .
Mme de Sabran
Mme de Sabran

Messages : 41492
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013
Localisation : l'Ouest sauvage

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Gouverneur Morris le Jeu 20 Juin - 19:33

Merci Eléonore!

La coquette aura refusé de se voir ridée Eventaille
Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris

Messages : 6257
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Gouverneur Morris le Dim 7 Juil - 20:58

Vu chez Christie’s mercredi et mentionné par LNLN je ne sais plus où Eventaille Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 3318396864 :

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 978b7010

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 22518610

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 2b78b310

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Be361710

Clichés personnels
Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris

Messages : 6257
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Dim 7 Juil - 21:10

Gouverneur Morris a écrit:Vu chez Christie’s mercredi et mentionné par LNLN je ne sais plus où Eventaille Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 3318396864 :

Juste au dessus, même page... Eventaille

Merci beaucoup pour ces photos complémentaires ! cheers
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Jeu 24 Oct - 7:34

Présenté prochainement en vente aux enchères :

- Portrait of Emma, Lady Hamilton (1765-1815), as the Magdalene
By George Romney
(Dalton-in-Furness, Lancashire 1734-1802 Kendal, Cumbria)
oil on canvas
40 3/8 x 33 ½ in. (102.6 x 85.3 cm.)

Provenance
Commissioned in 1791 by George, Prince of Wales (1762-1830), by whom given in 1810 to the following,
Francis, 2nd Marquess of Hertford (1743-1822), and by descent (...)
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 George22
Image : Christie's

Lot Essay :

The life of Emma Hart (1765-1815), whose beauty and vivacious character took her from humble origins as the daughter of an illiterate Welsh blacksmith to become the mistress and later wife of the diplomat, antiquarian, collector and vulcanologist Sir William Hamilton (1730-1803), the king's Minister Plenipotentiary at the Bourbon Court in Naples, and later mistress of the celebrated naval hero, Lord Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), was both extraordinary and, in the end, tragic.

The beauty that captured the hearts of both Hamilton and Nelson exerted a similarly magnetic attraction on the imagination of several of the leading artists of the day and none more so than Romney.
He first met Emma when she was still the mistress of his friend, the Hon. Charles Greville (1749-1809), who was later responsible for introducing her to his widowed uncle, Sir William Hamilton.

Greville brought Emma to Romney's studio in 1782 to sit for a portrait and soon became his muse. Romney was deeply affected by Emma’s departure for Naples with Hamilton in 1786 and slumped into an artistic decline.
When they returned to London in 1791 in order to marry, Romney wrote excitedly to his future biographer, William Hayley:

at present, and for the greater part of this summer, I shall be engaged in painting pictures from the divine lady. I cannot give her any other epithet, for I think her superior to all womenkind’ (W. Hayley, The Live of George Romney, London, 1809, p. 158).

This painting of Emma as a Magdalene was one of two works commissioned from Romney, together with a Bacchante, by George, Prince of Wales (1762-1830), future George IV of England, during the summer of 1791.

Taken together, the paintings can be seen as an exercise in thematic contrast: personifications of religious emotion against secular, or sorrow against joy (Kidson, op. cit., 2015, p. 684).

The two paintings were still unfinished when Emma left London for Naples in September 1791. On her arrival in Naples, she wrote to the artist enquiring whether the Prince had been to the studio to see the paintings, which suggests that they were near to completion and may also imply that Emma had been somehow instrumental in procuring the commission (op. cit., p. 683).
Romney replied in early 1792 that the Prince had sent Benjamin West, newly elected President of the Royal Academy, to inspect the two paintings and that ‘they were near finished’. Romney eventually received payment for the works in 1796.

In 1810, the paintings were gifted to Francis, 2nd Marquess of Hertford (1743-1822), who served as Lord Chamberlain between 1812 and 1822. The works passed by descent in his family until 1875, when they were sold at Christie’s, catalogued as The Tragic Muse and The Comic Muse.

Sans certitude s'il s'agit du portrait, en pendant, évoqué ici :
Spoiler:
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Captu475
Lady Hamilton in the Comic Muse
Private collection, USA
Image : The Romney Society

Originally of larger dimensions (120.5 x 154.4 cm.), this painting was reduced at some point after the 1939 sale at Christie’s.
Kidson recorded three smaller versions after this composition (all untraced; op. cit., pp. 684-5, nos. 1494a-c), attesting to the image’s appeal amongst contemporaries.

* Source et infos complémentaires : Christie's - Sale Old Masters and Sculptures, 29 Oct. 2019
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Gouverneur Morris le Lun 6 Jan - 18:52

Et vu au British Museum dans le cadre de la magnifique expo en cours, Troie, mythe et réalité :

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 5d510b10

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 C4d64010

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Cec08f10


Clichés personnels
Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris

Messages : 6257
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Mar 21 Jan - 14:19

Retour dans ce sujet suite à la diffusion, hier soir sur France 3, de l'excellent :

Arrow Secrets d'Histoire - Splendeur et déchéance de Lady Hamilton.

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Emma_h11
La Penserosa: a portrait of Lady Emma Hamilton
By Sir Thomas Lawrence, c. 1791-92
Image : The Abercorn Heirloom Settlement Trustees / Bryan F. Rutledge B.A


Idea Je reviens sur la fin de vie d'Emma, contrainte de fuir l'Angleterre avec sa fille, pour venir, comble du destin, s'échouer en France, à Calais.
Le site internet de la ville de Calais présente ainsi le monument érigé à sa mémoire :

MONUMENT À LADY HAMILTON

Inauguré le 23 avril 1994, ce monument offert par les membres de l’association britannique Club 1805 commémore la mémoire de Lady HAMILTON.
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Tomb_e10
Images : Calais - Côte d'Opale

Issue d’une famille modeste anglaise, Emma LYON (née en 1765) devient aide-nurse à la mort de son père puis part à Londres pour divers petits emplois. (Petits emplois, c'est mignon... Eventaille)
Ses années avec Charles GREVILLE, descendant « des WARWICK », lui font rencontrer l’oncle de ce dernier, Sir William HAMILTON, ambassadeur de sa majesté à Naples.
A l’initiative de son compagnon, elle part à Naples pour devenir une Lady en tant que maîtresse de l’oncle, contre paiement par ce dernier des dettes de GREVILLE.

Lors de ce séjour, elle comprend qu’elle a été manipulée et épouse en 1791, à Londres, Sir HAMILTON. En 1793, elle rencontre Sir Horatio NELSON, venu à Naples chercher des renforts pour contrer les Français. Cet illustre marin, de retour après la bataille d’Aboukir (Egypte), est accueilli en triomphateur.
Cependant, le héros tombe malade et c’est Emma qui le soigne avec dévouement alors qu’on le juge perdu. Une romance d’amour éclate entre Emma et Horatio, mariés chacun de leur côté.
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Lady_h10
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Capt1835
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Capt1834
Images : Calais - Côte d'Opale

De retour à Londres, le trio s’installe et Emma aménage sa propriété à la gloire de son héros. Elle donne naissance à Horatia NELSON le 3 janvier 1801. Mais la mort de Sir HAMILTON en 1803 puis de NELSON en 1805 porte un coup terrible à Emma, annonciateur de sa déchéance.
Elle épuise rapidement l'héritage de Sir William et s’endette profondément.
Malgré le statut de NELSON, héros national, les instructions qu'il laisse au gouvernement pour Emma sont ignorées. De crainte d’être incarcérée pour dettes, elle se réfugie avec sa fille à Calais et meurt d'alcoolisme en 1815, dans une maison, rue Française.


* Source texte : Ville de Calais - Monument à Emma Hamilton


Idea Et voici quelques images de la maison où elle acheva sa vie romanesque, rue Française, aujourd'hui totalement transformée...
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Capt1838
Image : Google Maps
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 58e4e410
Image : Calais.fr / Fred Collier

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Capt1837

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Capt1836
Images : Calais en 1901
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Gouverneur Morris le Mar 21 Jan - 16:36

Oh merci LNLN !

Quel dommage que cette modeste et émouvante maison ait été détruite...
Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris

Messages : 6257
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Mme de Sabran le Mar 21 Jan - 16:54


Merci, cher la nuit, la neige ! Very Happy

Gouverneur Morris a écrit: cette modeste et émouvante maison ...

Oui, il y a loin du lit de rêve dans lequel Emma devait s'endormir à Caserte à ce pauvre grabat que nous montre ta dernière photo ...

_________________
...    demain est un autre jour .
Mme de Sabran
Mme de Sabran

Messages : 41492
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013
Localisation : l'Ouest sauvage

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Mar 21 Jan - 18:08

Je reviens avec un extrait des Mémoires de la comtesse de Boigne que nous citions précédemment (page 2 de ce sujet pour la citation complète) qui étrille cette chère Emma...

Mémoires de la comtesse de Boigne a écrit:
Hors cet instinct pour les arts, rien n'était plus vulgaire et plus commun que lady Hamilton. Lorsqu'elle quittait la tunique antique pour porter le costume ordinaire, elle perdait toute distinction. Sa conversation était dépourvue d'intérêt, même d'intelligence.
Cependant il fallait bien qu'elle eût une sorte de finesse à ajouter à la séduction de son incomparable beauté, car elle a exercé une entière domination sur les personnes qu'elle a eu intérêt à gouverner : son vieux mari d'abord qu'elle a couvert de ridicule, la reine de Naples qu'elle a spoliée et déshonorée, et lord Nelson qui a souillé sa gloire sous l'empire de cette femme, devenue monstrueusement grasse et ayant perdu sa beauté.

Malgré tout ce qu'elle s'était fait donner par lui, par la reine de Naples et par sir William Hamilton, elle a fini par mourir dans la détresse et l'humiliation aussi bien que dans le désordre. C'était, à tout à prendre, une mauvaise femme et une âme basse dans une enveloppe superbe.
Oups !  Eventaille

Mais c'est ce passage qui m'intéresse plus particulièrement :

Mémoires de la comtesse de Boigne a écrit:

La reine de Naples avait eu beaucoup de peine à consentir à la recevoir. Ma mère avait été employée par sir William à obtenir cette faveur.
(...)
Il est indubitable que les cruelles vengeances exercées à Naples, sous le nom de la Reine et de lord Nelson, ont été provoquées, on peut même dire commandées par lady Hamilton. Elle leur persuadait mutuellement que chacun d'eux les exigeait.
Ma mère en fut d'autant plus désolée qu'elle était fort attachée à la reine Caroline avec laquelle elle est restée en correspondance très suivie, et à qui elle a eu dans la suite de grandes obligations.

Idea Dans le documentaire vu hier soir, il est dit qu'Emma rencontre la reine Marie-Caroline après avoir épousé Lord Hamilton en Angleterre (1791), et qu'elle est parvenue à conquérir la confiance de la reine de Naples parce qu'elle lui aurait remis une lettre confiée par Marie-Antoinette lors du retour vers Naples du couple Hamilton.

Nous avions déjà évoqué cette hypothétique lettre, au début de ce sujet, avec la citation suivante de la biographie Wiki consacrée à Emma Hamilton :

Sur le chemin du retour vers Naples, le couple fait halte à Vincennes où il rencontre le roi Louis XVI et la reine Marie-Antoinette, qui sont alors en résidence surveillée. La reine lui confie une lettre destinée à la reine de Naples, sa sœur. C'est ainsi qu'elle devient une amie proche de la reine Marie-Caroline d'Autriche, épouse de Ferdinand Ier de Naples *.

* Source : Natalia Griffon de Pleineville, "Amiral Nelson, la face cachée du héros" dans la Revue Napoléon, no 21, juin 2016, p. 43-55

Nous aimerions bien en savoir plus... Question

S'il est possible d'admettre que Marie-Antoinette ait consenti à "croiser" l'ambassadeur d'Angleterre à Naples et son épouse, alors de passage en France, aurait-elle confié à cette "aventurière" une lettre destinée à sa soeur ?
Si c'est le cas, il est à supposer que la teneur du courrier devait être fort banale.


Idea Nous avions présenté un mot, attribué à Marie-Antoinette, adressé à son beau-frère, ici :

Arrow Lettre de Marie-Antoinette à Ferdinand Ier des Deux-Siciles


Idea Et pour ce qui concerne la correspondance et les écrits de / attribués à Marie-Caroline :

Arrow Lettre de Marie-Caroline à la duchesse de La Trémoïlle (Louise de Châtillon, princesse de Tarente)

Arrow Lettre de Marie-Caroline à la duchesse de Polignac

Arrow Le journal de la reine Marie-Caroline de Naples

Arrow Lettre de Marie-Caroline à Charles-Alexandre de Calonne

Arrow Lettres inédites de Marie-Caroline au marquis de Gallo
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Mme de Sabran le Mar 21 Jan - 18:52


Je ne la sens pas trop, cette histoire de lettre ...   Suspect

La nuit, la neige a écrit:
Il est indubitable que les cruelles vengeances exercées à Naples, sous le nom de la Reine et de lord Nelson, ont été provoquées, on peut même dire commandées par lady Hamilton. Elle leur persuadait mutuellement que chacun d'eux les exigeait.

...    carrément ?!!   Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 808868115   affraid      What a Face


Même à supposer que Mme de Boigne en rajoute ( jalousie de femme ?  condescendance pour une arriviste ?  mépris pour une ancienne prostituée  ?  )  ,  Emma semble vraiment avoir une très regrettable part d'ombre.
Du reste, les intervenants ont beaucoup vanté son éblouissante beauté et son intelligence, mais nous n'avons pas entendu grand chose sur ses qualités de coeur .

_________________
...    demain est un autre jour .
Mme de Sabran
Mme de Sabran

Messages : 41492
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013
Localisation : l'Ouest sauvage

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Gouverneur Morris le Mar 21 Jan - 19:00

Oui n’oublions pas que derrière sa grande perspicacité sur bien des événements, qui va parfois jusqu’à l’autocritique (Napoléon), Mme de Boigne reste une femme, une femme qui se souviendra toujours être née Osmond qui plus est Smile

Rappelons ainsi qu’elle ne consentit à épouser un riche aventurier que pour sauver sa famille de la misère.
Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris

Messages : 6257
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Mar 21 Jan - 20:57

Mme de Sabran a écrit:
Même à supposer que Mme de Boigne en rajoute ( jalousie de femme ?  condescendance pour une arriviste ?  mépris pour une ancienne prostituée  ?  ),  Emma semble vraiment avoir une très regrettable part d'ombre.
Que Mme de Boigne tente "d'épargner" Marie-Caroline comme d'autres ont tenté ainsi d'expliquer ce terrible "faux pas" dans la vie de Nelson est fort possible, mais il n'en reste pas moins que Lady Hamilton fut activement mêlée à cette répression impitoyable. Jusqu'à quel point ? C'est encore à voir.
Mais bon, ce n'est guère étonnant, après tout.
Elle était de toutes les manières du côté de Marie-Caroline, folle de rage contre les Français depuis la mort de sa soeur et l'invasion de ses états, et contre les "républicains" napolitains qui l'avaient contrainte de déguerpir de son palais (fuite désastreuse au cours de laquelle elle perd un enfant).
Emma se range du côté de sa "protectrice" : il n'est pas question pour elle de perdre la confiance de la reine.
Peut-être en profita-t-elle aussi pour régler quelques comptes à ceux qui l'avait méprisée ?

Mme de Sabran a écrit:Du reste, les intervenants ont beaucoup vanté son éblouissante beauté et son intelligence, mais nous n'avons pas entendu grand chose sur ses qualités de coeur .
Quel coeur ? Dans quel état est-il ?
Je ne voudrais pas être cynique mais elle a bien trop souffert : prostituée adolescente, méprisée par ses premiers amants, contrainte d'abandonner son premier enfant, "vendue" par son premier amour. Crois-tu qu'elle a épousé Lord Hamilton parce qu'elle l'aimait ?
C'est une survivante, dans un monde rude et impitoyable pour une femme de sa condition.
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Mme de Sabran le Mar 21 Jan - 21:04


Tu crois que tous les hommes et femmes qui sont maltraités par la vie y perdent leurs âmes ?

_________________
...    demain est un autre jour .
Mme de Sabran
Mme de Sabran

Messages : 41492
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013
Localisation : l'Ouest sauvage

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Mar 21 Jan - 21:47

Je parle de Lady Hamilton. C'est une ambitieuse, qui s'est sans doute rendu compte assez vite que ses "qualités de coeur" n'étaient pas ce pourquoi elle est parvenue à tirer son épingle du jeu.
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Mme de Sabran le Mar 21 Jan - 22:11


Mais donc, convenons-en, elle a bien obtenu ce qu'elle voulait au bout du compte, dans un premier temps tout du moins :  c'est à dire sortir de la misère et de sa condition de pauvre fille du peuple obligée de se vendre .
Loin du fog londonien, elle se prélasse dans les palais de Naples.  Elle roule carrosse.
Quand elle devient partie prenante dans la répression atroce exercée par Marie-Caroline ( peut-être même l'instigatrice, selon Mme de Boigne ! ), elle n'a pas encore,  pour montrer autant de cruauté   (  attention, hein !   si c'est vrai ... ), elle n'a pas encore, disais-je, l'excuse d'être tellement blessée par la vie et retombée dans l'indigence sordide qu'elle connaîtra par la suite .

J'ai bien peur d'être confuse . Est-ce que tu me suis ?! Hop!

_________________
...    demain est un autre jour .
Mme de Sabran
Mme de Sabran

Messages : 41492
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013
Localisation : l'Ouest sauvage

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par La nuit, la neige le Mer 22 Jan - 9:22

Ah ? Tu parlais donc de cet épisode exclusivement ? Eh bien je ne sais pas quoi te répondre...

Force est de constater qu'elle n'aurait pas cherché à convaincre Nelson tout d'abord, puis Marie-Caroline et Ferdinand, de se montrer plus cléments envers les "révolutionnaires" napolitains.
Bien au contraire, apparemment : des témoignages du temps existent.
No mercy !!
Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Veduta11
Destruction de l'arbre de la liberté à Largo di Palazzo
Guiscard? / Saviero (Xavier) della Gatta? (active 1777-1828)
Huile sur toile, 1799
Collection particulière
Image : Wikipedia
La nuit, la neige
La nuit, la neige

Messages : 13955
Date d'inscription : 21/12/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons - Page 4 Empty Re: Emma Hart, Lady Hamilton, née Amy Lyons

Message par Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Page 4 sur 4 Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4

Revenir en haut


 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum